Russia will have its first quadrivalent influenza vaccine

| By | Petrovax, SPbSRIVS, Vaccine Production
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In the near future, Russia will register its first locally-produced quadrivalent influenza vaccine. According to the experts, this vaccine has not only the most effective and safe profile possible today, but also provides undeniable pharmacoeconomic advantages. Its use will allow to prevent up to 265.8 thousand cases of influenza per season and save more than 2.5 billion rubles of state budget funds compared to traditional trivalent vaccines.

The unique immunoadjuvant polyoxidonium developed by Petrovax Pharm allowed to create fourth generation of vaccines (subunit vaccines). The presence of polyoxidonium in the vaccine leads to quick and stable immune response, a 3-fold reduction of viral antigen dose and increased safety of vaccination. This technology is unique and has no analogs in the world. It was already used for 20 years in the manufacturing of such vaccines as Grippol and Grippol Plus.

Olga Orekhova, Vice President for Research and Registration of Drugs in Russia and Abroad, NPO Petrovax Pharm, said, “The vaccine will be manufactured in Russia under a full-cycle technology starting with the production of substances, including antigens, in disposable syringes without preservatives in accordance with the GMP standards by such Russian immunobiological companies as NPO Petrovax Pharm LLC and St. Petersburg Institute of Vaccines and Serums of FMBA of Russia . The development of quadrivalent vaccine is a significant contribution of our company to the progress of immunobiological industry and a logical continuation for the range of modern influenza vaccines. The vaccine will be available for adult population immunization in Russia as early as 2018. We are planning to develop the exports and introduce the vaccine, first of all, to the markets of EAEU member states and the Middle East.”

SOURCE: gmpnews.ru
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