EMA put off the registration of more than 300 generic medicines

| By | Drug Quality Control, EMA, Generics, Pharmaceutical Industry
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The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has recommended suspending a number of nationally approved medicines for which bioequivalence studies were conducted by Micro Therapeutic Research Labs at two sites in India. Bioequivalence studies are usually the basis for approval of generic medicines. The list of medicines recommended for suspension can be found here. The suspensions can be lifted once alternative data establishing bioequivalence are provided.

Alternative supporting data have already been provided for several of the medicines reviewed. Therefore, the EMA’s Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) recommended that these medicines can remain on the market. The list of medicines recommended to remain on the market is available here.

The Agency also recommended that medicines not yet authorised but which are being evaluated on the basis of bioequivalence studies from these sites should not be authorised until bioequivalence is demonstrated using alternative data.

Micro Therapeutic Research Labs is a contract research organisation (CRO) which conducts the analytical and clinical parts of bioequivalence studies, some of which are used to support marketing authorisation applications of medicines in the EU.

The review of medicines studied by Micro Therapeutic Research Labs was started after inspections to check compliance with good clinical practice (GCP) by Austrian and Dutch authorities in February 2016. The inspections identified several concerns at the company’s sites regarding misrepresentation of study data and deficiencies in documentation and data handling.

The review, by CHMP, concluded that data from studies conducted at the sites between June 2012 and June 2016 are unreliable and cannot be accepted as a basis for marketing authorisation in the EU. However, there is no evidence of harm or lack of effectiveness of medicines authorised and being evaluated in the EU on the basis of studies at the sites.

The CHMP’s recommendation concerning these medicines will now be sent to the European Commission for a legally binding decision valid throughout the EU.